Sugar Found in Most Yogurts is Bad For You and Causes Inflammation for People with Arthritis

Yogurt Bad

Bad Yogurt.

Here we go again with food manufacturers putting bad shit in our food and lying to us calling it healthy.  The food manufacturers keep promoting Greek yogurt as beneficial for you, but most of that product — including other yogurts — contain way too much sugar.  It’s like eating ice cream and adds fat to your stomach (see the cholesterol and sugars on the label).  So you think you’re eating healthy when eating yogurt — think again.   Sugary foods such as this cause inflammation and pain in people with arthritis, but sugar-free yogurt fights arthritis inflammation in five ways.

See Foods That Aren’t Good for Arthritis for tips.  Avoid consuming meats and take FISH OIL, which is an anti-inflammatory.  Eat lots of cherries and blackberries.  See 5 Superfoods That Relieve Arthritis Pain.

The ONLY yogurt that’s good for you is the PLAIN KIND with “probiotics” listed on the container.  Sure this tastes nasty, but if you blend a banana in it with berries (which are anti-inflammatory), then you are putting something very good in your gut.  READ THE LABEL before buying the expensive “Greek” yogurts especially.  Food manufacturers keep POISONING US with too much sugar, fat and salt under the guise “natural.”  They are causing the deaths of hundreds of thousands each year due to obesity.

Fat:
0 grams fat!
Nonfat yogurt has less than 0.5 percent milk fat.
Nonfat yogurt has the same nutrients as yogurt made with whole milk.

Calcium:
Look for 20 percent of daily calcium. This is about 200 mg.

Sugar:
Look for yogurt with as close to 12 grams per 6-oz. serving as possible. (Greek yogurt will have even less!)
This is the amount of natural sugar found in yogurt from the lactose.
Note: if there is fruit added to the yogurt the sugar content will be higher. Look to see where the sugar grams are coming from. For example, real fruit versus refined sugar like high fructose corn syrup.

Calories:
Yogurt varies depending upon fat grams and added sugar. A benefit to yogurt is buying in portion controlled containers. If you are making the right choices and looking for lower fat and sugar options than you should get about: 15 to 20 calories per oz. So about 90 to 120 calories for a 6 oz. container.